Statistics for Multi-Country

Multi-Country Per Capita and VMT Fatality Data for 2004  [DSA table]


Multi-Country Per Capita Fatality Data for 2003  [DSA table]


Comparison of International Fatality Rates (currently 2003 and 2004)

Monash University, Australia

(For:  Australia, Canada, Germany, Japan, New Zealand Sweden, UK, USA)


Here at Drive And Stay Alive, Inc., we have also put together a chart showinginternational death rates (per head of population) covering the years 1988 through 2002. It also shows the rate of change, in death rates, in 24 of those countries.


WHO World Report on Road Traffic Injury Prevention — Corrigenda  (up to 2002)

The corrigenda updates the original, full report, which may be viewed here.


One of the most useful databases of world crash statistics is the ‘International Road Traffic and Accident Database’ (IRTAD) and in it the 30 participating member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) have registered various figures for the last few years.

In July 2005, IRTAD issued statistics for 2003.


An article in the OECD Observer, in March 2003, highlights variations in death rates in some countries. Read the article here.


The final version of the European Commission’s Road Safety Quick Indicator 2003 is now available. The publication is designed to provide very recent trends on basic road accident indicators (number of injury accidents, persons killed and injured) in European countries.  Full document (pdf).


Vulnerable Road User Fatalities in Europe, 2002 — A Country-by-Country Breakdown

(I.E.  Pedestrians and Pedal Cyclists)


OECD — Road Safety Performance — Trends and Comparative Analysis

Trends in Road Fatalities, 1990-2000

(also 2001-02, individually, plus seat belt wearing rates, and motorcyclist deaths)


Community Road Accident Database (CARE – Community database on Accidents on theRoads in Europe)  This is “a Community database on road accidents resulting in death or injury (no statistics on damage-only accidents). The major difference between CARE and most other existing international databases is the high level of disaggregation, i.e. CARE comprises detailed data on individual accidents as collected by the Member States. This structure allows for maximum flexibility and potential with regard to analysing the information contained in the system and opens up a whole set of new possibilities in the field of accident analysis.”


1,300,000 accidents a year cause more than 40,000 deaths and 1,700,000 injuries [on the roads of European Union countries]. The direct and indirect cost has been estimated at 160 billion euros, i.e. 2% of the EU’s GNP. Certain groups of the population or categories of road user are particularly vulnerable: young people aged between 15 and 24 (10,000 killed each year), pedestrians (7,000) and cyclists (1,800).

The Commission therefore proposed that the European Union should set itself the target of halving the number of road deaths by 2010.

More details here.


The EUROPA website carries an index for “Road Safety, Country Profiles” View it here.


The European Commission’s CARE is a Community database on road accidents resulting in death or injury (no statistics on damage – only accidents). The major difference between CARE and most other existing international databases is the high level of disaggregation, i.e. CARE comprises detailed data on individual accidents as collected by the Member States. This structure allows for maximum flexibility and potential with regard to analyzing the information contained in the system and opens up a whole set of new possibilities in the field of accident analysis.


The U.S. State Department provides an excellent page of links to individual countries’ Road Safety Statistics and  Databases.